Pieces of Bridges

The semi-coherent and hopefully sometimes educational ramblings of a ridiculously geeky biochemistry student.
biocanvas:

Fruit fly larval brain
With over 100 billion neurons, humans are capable of impossibly intricate behaviors. Fruit flies, on the other hand, have 100,000 neurons—a mere 0.0001% of what we possess. Robot makers turn to fruit flies to understand how a system with “low computational power” can execute sophisticated “commands,” such as honing in on a food source in a chaotic environment. Using their antennae, fruit flies detect odors arising from food, but the odor plume is chaotically dispersed by wind. How do flies know precisely where to land? Researchers at the University of Washington demonstrated that after sensing an odor, fruit flies visually search for round, high-contrast objects as potential odor sources. If it’s inedible, flies move on to the next object. Understanding how fruit flies use these simple cues could aid in designing programs for controlling robots of the future.
Image by Christian Klämbt, University of Muenster, Germany.

biocanvas:

Fruit fly larval brain

With over 100 billion neurons, humans are capable of impossibly intricate behaviors. Fruit flies, on the other hand, have 100,000 neurons—a mere 0.0001% of what we possess. Robot makers turn to fruit flies to understand how a system with “low computational power” can execute sophisticated “commands,” such as honing in on a food source in a chaotic environment. Using their antennae, fruit flies detect odors arising from food, but the odor plume is chaotically dispersed by wind. How do flies know precisely where to land? Researchers at the University of Washington demonstrated that after sensing an odor, fruit flies visually search for round, high-contrast objects as potential odor sources. If it’s inedible, flies move on to the next object. Understanding how fruit flies use these simple cues could aid in designing programs for controlling robots of the future.

Image by Christian Klämbt, University of Muenster, Germany.

(Source: microscopyu.com)

jtotheizzoe:

silicongarden:

Looking At Every Synapse In The Brain Is Breathtakingly Beautiful

A reminder that the brain is not an orderly system of wires connected end-to-end, but rather the most powerful ball of tangled Christmas lights on Earth.

So often we see neurons drawn in isolation, but cutting into a section of brain is like slicing through a mashed-up wad of multicolor Play-Doh snakes, except everything is the same color, and it’s really small.

Sometimes I wonder if my analogies make any sense. Just go with me here.

(Source: gizmodo.com.au)

221cbakerstreet:

my response to “trends men hate”

You are aware that this is exactly what the women who write these articles (because they are written by women) want you to do, right? It’s quite clever of them, really…

(Source: lerosier, via esotericcoteries)